Weekly App Store Gems – Cars and Cows and Birds, Oh My!

Every single day thousands of applications flood the the open doors of Apple’s App Store. Some are genuinely good while others are trash that someone has created simply to squeeze a few bucks out of, which causes many of the deserving applications to slip under the view of a casual App Store user. Therefore, in order to shed light on these underrated applications, iPhone Alley has begun to highlight any hidden gems hiding within the arsenal of applications the App Store currently hosts. Whether you’re the kind seeking a worthwhile game to waste some time, or you’re in search of an intuitive utility that bests every other, these weekly guides are your ultimate resource for finding apps that have slipped under the general radar of App Store users.

 

Twitterrific 5 for Twitter

Twitterrific 5 for Twitter

by The Iconfactory


This app is designed for both iPhone and iPad
free
>

Until now, the main Twitter-client competition remains between the official application released by Twitter itself, as well as Paul Haddad’s and Mark Jardine’s combined endeavor, Tweetbot. The two aforementioned apps have seemingly captivated iOS users as even the app we posted about in last week’s edition of Weekly App Store Gems, Flurry, which was fairly decent, failed to give either a run for their money.

In what seems like the App Store’s biggest ever example of a total overhaul, developer Iconfactory has released a large update/new instance of their previously widely-popular Twitter client Twitterific.

A universal application, Twitterific is more than your average Twitter client. If you’ve been a constant user of Tweetbot until now, you’ll undoubtedly be accustomed to the app’s cool, polished user interface. Twitterific similarly entices users with its easily-navigable menus and slick user interface elements.

To keep things fresh, Twitterific does a lot of things differently than the two, previously-mentioned Twitter clients. Because of its clever execution of space management and intuitive gesture-based controls, there’s a lot of free space keeping the user interface extremely clutter-free. The navigation icons line the top of the screen rather than the bottom, which is a minute difference between Twitterific and Twitter/Tweetbot. Tapping on someone else’s tweet will allow you to do the usual with it: retweet, favorite, quote, etc. Swiping allows you to reply, while you can read the conversation threat of a tweet simply by clicking on the dedicated icon.

Another interesting addition is the variability and different options that are offered to the user. Things like the overall graphical can be changed to reflect the time of day (bright during the day, dark at night), font and user’s icon sizes can be adjusted, and the font that’s used throughout the app can be tweaked to your preference.

These simple additions and functionality differences warrant a sure purchase in favor of Twitterific. I’ve been a dedicated used of Tweetbot since its initial release, and I have reason to believe that Iconfactory’s Twitterific is going to present a challenge to developer Tapbot’s otherwise-dominant Tweetbot.


Cubed Rally Redline

Cubed Rally Redline

by Jared Bailey


This app is designed for both iPhone and iPad
free
>

iOS developer No Can Win is back with yet another racing title to serve as a continuation to its debut onto the App Store. Cubed Rally Redline poses users with controlling a cubed blue car in its endless race.

Set atop a five-lane road, suspended in what seems as mid-air, your job as the player is to travel as far as possible while navigating through and around the various obstacles laid out randomly. Your only control? One simple tap, its function dependent on which side of the screen you’ve touched.

As the car travels on automatically, you must guide it by clicking on the left and right sides of the screen. Doing so will shift the vehicle over one lane to each side, allowing you to avoid obstacles set on each lane. These obstacles include simple, common things such as rocks and trees, and range all the way to walking cows and spikes that randomly appear.

Items such as coins can be collected for use in the app’s in-game shop. Here the user can purchase different types of vehicles for use, each equipped with its own advantages.

There are currently two ways the user’s game can be ended: obstacles and lack of fuel. Along the way, containers of gas will be able to be collected replenishing the fuel meter that runs along the bottom of the screen. Let it deplete, and it’s game over.

Cubed Rally Redline is a bundle of retro fun for any gamer. It offers quick, short bursts of gameplay and could just as well be used for a long-lasting time-waster for the casual gamer. Check it out if you fancy a super title for a buck.